• Battle for Banff

    The Battle for Banff: Exploring the Heritage of the Banff-Bow Valley 1930 to 1985

    By : E.J. (Ted) Hart

    1st edition

    ISBN: 0969973284

    $27.95
    368 pages
    Paperback
    6 x 9 inches
    April 2003

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    ABOUT THIS BOOK

    Learn about Banff history in this sweeping examination of the period between the passing of the National Parks Act in 1930 and the centennial of Banff National Park in 1985. The Battle for Banff follows in the footsteps of the first book in this series on the heritage of Banff and the Bow Valley, The Place of Bows. It reveals how many of the features of valley life—mountaineering, skiing, warden search and rescue, resource conservation, environmental activism, and community political development—evolved in a period of notoriety for Canada’s most famous national park.

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    E. J. (TED) HART’s life and career have been dominated by the history of Banff. Born and educated in Edmonton, Alberta, Ted graduated with a Masters in Western Canadian History at the University of Alberta in 1971. The following year he was hired by the late Maryalice Stewart to work in the archives at what was then known as the Peter Whyte Foundation, beginning what would be a 40-year-long career involved with the cultural history of Banff and the Canadian Rockies. Encouraged by noted mountain poet Jon Whyte, Ted published his first book on Canadian Rockies history, Diamond Hitch, the Early Outfitters and Guides of Banff and Jasper, in 1975. In 1976, Hart took over as the head of the Whyte Foundation, a position that evolved into the Director of the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies and that he held until 2008. During this period Hart authored 12 books relating to Banff and the Rockies, including his award winning The Selling of Canada: The CPR and the Beginnings of Canadian Tourism; Jimmy Simpson, Legend of the Rockies and a work of fiction, Ain’t it Hell: Bill Peyto’s “Mountain Journal.” Between 2008 and 2010 Ted continued to oversee the archives at the Whyte Museum and work on a major biography of Dominion Parks Commissioner J. B. Harkin, published in 2010 as J. B. Harkin, Father of Canada’s National Parks. Ted retired from the Whyte Museum in 2010 and now lives with his wife, Pat, south of Calgary in the foothills town of Okotoks.